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I created this blog as an instrument of what I have encountered in the world of veterinary medicine as a proud vet student. Comments and suggestions are welcome here at;

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Regards,
Aina Meducci 2012

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The following blog posts is not genuinely from my research but through readings and citation from trusted website. I do not own any of the copyright and therefore you may use it at your own risk

SINCE I AM NOT A VETERINARIAN YET, THEREFORE I CAN'T CONSULT ANY MEDICAL ADVICE TO YOU AND YOUR PETS! EXTREMELY IMPORTANT!.

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The Modified Robert Jones Bandage

In class, we were taught to demonstrate modified Robert Jones Bandage with a cat. This is just a quick revision before I started my clinical industrial training shortly.




Bandaging a cat using MRJB


The Robert Jones bandage is a common external splint applied to a limb for the temporary support of a fracture before surgical intervention can occur. It is used to treat many canine and feline limb injuries (e.g., tibial fractures, severe limb lacerations). It promotes healing by immobilizing the injured area, thereby limiting swelling and providing protection from secondary trauma. Compared with other padded bandages, the Robert-Jones bandage offers limb stability, tissue fluid absorption, and protection from trauma. Generally, most of the compression is lost after several hours to days as the cotton loosens. For definitive support of a fracture the bandage should never be on longer than a few days without reinforcement using rigid splint material.

The Modified Robert Jones bandage can be applied for the temporary compression of a limb after surgery. It functions to protect the incision site and decrease swelling to aid in healing.


Materials needed



Stirrup tape



Cotton roll (Plenty of them)



Surgical cast padding





A Vet wrap (only 1)



Let's just says a dog with fracture hindlimb underwent surgery to correct the bone. This is the steps on how the animal should be bandage to protect the bone. The 5 very simple step.



Step 1

Step 1: Using white bandage tape, place stirrups on the distal 1/3rd of the limb overlapping the toes and extending approximately an equal length from the end of the leg. Be sure to tab the ends for easy separation later on.



Step 2

Step 2: Wrap the leg lightly with cast padding starting at the toes and moving proximally. Overlap the bandage 50% as you wrap and try to get 2 layers of padding. Note - it is important not to exceed approximately two layers of cast padding. Excessive padding will cause premature loosening of the bandage as the cotton compresses overtime.



Step 3


Step 3: Wrap the leg tightly with a conforming bandage starting at the toes and moving proximally. This is the step where you create compression, however, not as much as you would with the standard Robert Jones bandage. Overlap the bandage 50% as you wrap and make sure the toes are still visible.




Step 4

Step 4: Separate the tape stirrups, rotate them proximally, and secure them to the compression bandage thus creating a barrier and preventing the bandage from slipping down. Note - you should always make sure some of the underlying cast padding is visible on the end by the toes.




Step 5

Step 5: Wrap the leg in vet wrap starting at the toes at an angle to cover the distal ends of the bandage and again moving proximally as you progress. Be sure to overlap 50% as you apply the material.



Sources: Directly taken from:
http://cal.vet.upenn.edu/projects/orthopod/csfr/terms/modifiedrobertjonesbandagecipage.htm



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1 comments:

majid said...

THANK YOU ALL THE BEST

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